Catholicism

The Next Catholic Scandal

June 12, 2019

លទ្ធផល​រូបភាព​សម្រាប់ sex priest

As the U.S. bishops prepare to meet next week for their general assembly in Baltimore, they must be hoping it won’t be a repeat of this one.

The bishops were hoping to finalize a tough new policy on child sex abuse and – even more importantly – abuse cover-up, after the Vatican put a halt on the issue during the USCCB’s fall assembly last year. Since then, there has been a Vatican abuse summit and new legislation from the Vatican to battle abuse and cover-up, meaning the possibility of a “good news” ending to the meeting was in the cards.

But now new scandals are likely to overshadow the meeting.

At the beginning of this week, the Associated Press published a story about a woman accusing a top official in the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston of sexual misconduct. This story was followed by a Washington Post report on a confidential investigation into impropriety under Bishop Michael Bransfield in the Diocese of Wheeling-Charleston. On Thursday, Crux came out with a story about how various Church institutions passed the buck when a seminarian complained about sexual abuse at the national seminary in Washington, DC.

These stories did not involve the abuse of minors, but did involve sexual impropriety with adults. This means the bishops will be trying to find a solution to one systematic crisis, just as another one is exploding in the papers.

Sexual misconduct with adults is a broad area of offense, especially for a celibate clergy. It can include anything from a brief fling with a willing partner to a sexual assault. Current Vatican legislation generally only covers “vulnerable adults” – that is, those without the full use of reason, although Pope Francis’s most recent law – released in May and called Vos estis lux mundi – defines a vulnerable person as “any person in a state of infirmity, physical or mental deficiency, or deprivation of personal liberty which, in fact, even occasionally, limits their ability to understand or to want or otherwise resist the offence.”

The new legislation also covers those who are forced into sexual acts by “violence or threat or through abuse of authority.”

Although these are steps in the right direction, it is murky how it will work in practice.

In Houston, a high-ranking archdiocesan official is accused of having an affair with a married woman he was counseling. In Texas, it is a crime for a clergyman to engage in sexual relations with someone by “exploiting the other person’s emotional dependency on the clergyman in the clergyman’s professional character as spiritual adviser.”

The woman also said the priest absolved her for their sexual encounter, which is a Church crime carrying a penalty of excommunication, although this is denied by the archdiocese.

In this case, the priest was moved to another diocese. (The archdiocese insists that it acted properly.)

In West Virginia, a Church investigation found that Bransfield, aside from gross financial mismanagement, had “uncovered a consistent pattern of sexual innuendo, and overt suggestive comments and actions toward those over whom the former bishop exercised authority,” although the investigators said they could not prove sexual abuse had happened.

In the Washington seminary case, a seminarian was allegedly abused by a transitional deacon, not by someone in direct authority.

In all these cases, Church leaders had to make decisions without having any specific Church legislation to work with, although – as in the case of Texas – there are civil and criminal laws that can come into play.

This comes up time and time again – clergymen have been caught with prostitutes, had affairs with parishioners, and committed other violations of their promises of celibacy for generations. Bishops will be quick to point out: Not every sin is a crime, and a lapse in judgement shouldn’t be equated with sexual assault.

But the gray between the two can differ in shade.

If a priest has an affair with a parishioner, what are the consequences? If the parishioner is married? If he is counseling the parishioner?

What happens when a priest gets caught up in a prostitution sting? What if he has been arrested more than once?

The same sorts of questions can be asked about possession of pornography, serial affairs, and other subjects that most of the faithful would hope would only feature in soap operas.

Right now, Church leaders seem to follow the same game plan that was in effect for child abuse: Therapy, clergy moves, and payoffs.

Without procedures and transparency, even relatively small sexual mistakes by priests can be conflated with more serious cases of sexual assault, especially in the eyes of a faithful exhausted by years of scandal.

One thing the bishops don’t want to happen is to institute a “one strike” rule for clerics when it comes to sex with adults.

However, in the #MeToo era, hard decisions will have to be made about what can be forgiven, and what will have to have more permanent consequences.

Can prayers keep hurricanes away from Key West?

June 12, 2019

The Grotto at Basilica of the Star of the Sea in Key West is where locals flock to pray every hurricane season.

Short answer – No.

Long answer – Of course not.

Throughout each hurricane season, locals leave candles and say prayers at The Grotto at the Basilica of St. Mary Star of the Sea, hoping they can pray away a storm striking the island.

Throughout each hurricane season, locals leave candles and say prayers at The Grotto at the Basilica of St. Mary Star of the Sea, hoping they can pray away a storm striking the island.

Kay Thomas knows she can’t do much when a hurricane is approaching the Florida Keys.

She can stock up on supplies, evacuate from the island chain, or ride it out like she did during 2017’s Hurricane Irma — which spared her hometown of Key West but severely damaged Keys neighborhoods to the north.

But there is one thing she does at the start of each hurricane season: pray.

“That’s about the best I can do,” Thomas said. “I feel better even though I know that just me alone, I’m not moving mountains.”

Every June 1, locals like Thomas flock to an Old Town church in an effort to pray away storms from directly striking the island.

The candles flicker in an outdoor space at The Basilica of St. Mary Star of the Sea, 1010 Windsor Lane, called the Grotto.

Thomas, who describes herself as a spiritual seeker rather than religious, offers a prayer every month, from June 1 through the end of November.

“I light one at the beginning and then as they begin to manifest the Grotto gets extra candles,” Thomas said. “It makes me feel like I can do something.”

The Grotto is formally called Our Lady of Lourdes Grotto, which dates back to 1922 and honors Sister Louis Gabriel.

Key West lore says the candle prayer ritual works when it comes to staving off hurricanes from the tiny island. A major storm hasn’t struck the island since the Grotto was created.

Hurricane Wilma swamped the island in 2005 and Hurricane Georges came across in 1998. But the island has been spared — so far.

At the time of the Grotto’s installation, Sister Gabriel had lived on the island since 1897 and had survived three major hurricanes, including the 1919 direct hit that left destruction across Key West.

Apparently, Sister Gabriel always said that as long as the Grotto was standing, “Key West would never experience the full brunt of a hurricane.”

After one horrible season in the early 2000s, one local shop put up a sign that read, “Canes 0, Grotto 3,” locals remember.

Still, plenty of Key West residents know from experience that prayers aren’t always enough to keep hurricanes at bay.

Dina DiMartino lost her home and her entire neighborhood to Hurricane Katrina in 2005 when she lived in a New Orleans suburb, St. Bernard Parish, where the levee system failed.

“The biggest part was losing where I grew up,” DiMartino said. “I go back and visit, but St. Bernard will never be the same. It’s such a small community like Key West. All the other stuff was just stuff.”

DiMartino, 48, a Louisiana native who taught school for 12 years before Katrina and then ran a security business, learned about the Grotto when she moved to Key West in 2012.

“I go with my three candles and make a donation and pray hard to keep our community protected,” she said. “I’ve done that every June 1. But I have to say, the days before Irma I went there a little bit more.”

The numbers of praying locals grew larger as Irma approached, she remembers.

“I grew up Catholic but have explored other thing,” DiMartino said of her spirituality. “I’m open-minded, not deeply religious. I’m a very superstitious person. I don’t know if that comes with growing up in New Orleans.”

What the fuck does that mean? What’s the difference between being religious and being superstitious?

Former Michigan priest arrested for sexual assault of a child

June 6, 2019

លទ្ធផល​រូបភាព​សម្រាប់ Timothy M. Crowley

Timothy M. Crowley, a former priest at St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church in Ann Arbor, was arrested on May 23 in Tempe, AZ, according to Maricopa County jail records. The next day, Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel announced Crowley was one of five Michigan Catholic priests her office charged with criminal sexual misconduct.

Crowley, 69, was charged in Washtenaw County with four felony counts of first-degree criminal sexual conduct, with a maximum sentence of life in prison, and four counts of second-degree criminal sexual conduct, with a maximum sentence of 15 years in prison. He is accused of assaulting a minor boy for about eight years while at St. Thomas from 1987 to 1990.

The charges come after months of investigation into sexual abuse by Michigan clergy inside the Catholic Church. The investigation was started in August 2018 by Nessel’s predecessor, former Attorney General Bill Schuette, following a report exposing widespread sexual abuse in the Pennsylvania Catholic Church.

All charges against Crowley fall within the statute of limitations because he has not been a Michigan resident since 1995. Prosecutors will move ahead with proceedings.

According to Nessel, all five cases began as tips from the Attorney General’s sexual abuse hotline, which she said has received more than 450 tips. The tips were then corroborated by interviews with victims and information found in the hundreds of thousands of documents seized from Michigan’s seven Catholic dioceses last October.

“Although we have charged these men with very serious crimes, I want to remind everyone that they are innocent until proven guilty by a court of law,” Nessel said in her announcement.

In a statement on the Attorney General Office’s website, Nessel emphasized the importance of holding large institutions accountable. Nessel was quoted in the statement saying she estimates her office has worked through only 5 to 10 percent of the documents, meaning the investigation could take more than two years to complete.

“This is about taking on large-scale institutions that turn a blind eye to victims and making certain we hold all of them accountable — that includes unapologetically pursuing any and all individuals who abuse their power by victimizing our residents,” the statement read.

The Attorney General’s Office asks anyone with information relevant to the clergy sexual abuse investigation to call the investigation hotline at 844-324-3374 or email [email protected]

In a statement released by the Diocese of Lansing following the Attorney General’s announcement, Lansing Bishop Earl Boyea expressed support for the charges and investigation.

“I welcome today’s action so that the truth can come out and justice may be served,” Boyea wrote. “Any priest who commits reprehensible acts against children does grave harm to victims. He betrays the priesthood and the entire Church. I pray that Christ brings healing to all involved.”

According to the affidavit filed in the Attorney General’s case against Crowley, the abuse began when the child was approximately 10 years old at St. Mary Parish in Jackson, where Crowley was a chaplain and the victim was an altar boy. From 1982 to 1990, as Crowley moved from St. Mary to St. Anthony in Hillsdale and then to St. Thomas in Ann Arbor, the boy attended these churches at the same time as well.

Crowley is accused of multiple illegal acts with a minor, including forcing oral sex and masturbation, watching pornography and providing alcohol or cigarettes. He allegedly threatened to kill the boy if he told the nun or his parents about the abuse.

Former priest wanted on child sex abuse charges in Arizona arrested in Italy

June 3, 2019

លទ្ធផល​រូបភាព​សម្រាប់ Joseph J. Henn

ROME – Italian police arrested former U.S. Salvatorian Father Joseph J. Henn 16 years after Italy’s highest court confirmed his extradition to the United States to face allegations of child sexual abuse in Arizona.

Michele Gentiloni, Henn’s attorney, said his client was taken into custody May 28 after trying to use his expired U.S. passport as identification to pick up some medicine he needed. A spokesman for the Carabinieri, the Italian police force that apprehended Henn, disputed that version of events, claiming instead that the priest had requested assistance at a city-run immigrant assistance center using a false name.

Henn, who was expelled from his order and removed from the priesthood in 2006, currently is in Rome’s Regina Coeli prison awaiting questioning, which must happen by June 3, his attorney told Catholic News Service May 31.

However, Gentiloni said he believes the 2006 extradition order is now null and void because “the police never moved to execute it.”

At the time, officials at the Salvatorian order’s headquarters in Rome, where Henn was assigned when the abuse allegations were made, had said Henn fled.

His lawyer said that was not true, but the Italian police never bothered to check, and they missed their 45-day period for notifying him of the extradition order.

“At the end of August 2006, the Italian Ministry of Justice, believing he was no longer present, issued an arrest warrant” for violating the terms of his house arrest, and it was on the basis of that warrant, not the extradition order, that police took him into custody 16 years later, the lawyer said.

A spokesman for the Carabinieri in Rome told CNS, “before he could be advised officially” that the court upheld the extradition request, “he disappeared and that is why he was declared a fugitive.”

Father Jeff Wocken, U.S. provincial of the Salvatorians, confirmed to CNS that Henn had been removed from the order and the priesthood in 2006, and that he had left the Salvatorian headquarters before the extradition order could be carried out.

Henn had been arrested in Rome in July 2005 after a request by the U.S. Justice Department that he be extradited to face charges in Maricopa County, Arizona.

He was placed under house arrest at the Salvatorian headquarters while his lawyer, Gentiloni, tried to fight the extradition order.

Henn had been accused of molesting at least three boys under the age of 15 between 1979 and 1981 when he was living and working in Phoenix.

In 2003, Arizona’s Maricopa County indicted him on 13 counts related to child molestation.

Gentiloni had told CNS in 2005 that Henn “would accept facing trial in the United States because he is innocent, but he fears for his physical safety” in a U.S. prison given the climate created by the U.S. clerical abuse scandals.

Priest made young boys dress up as Baby Jesus then sexually abused them

June 3, 2019

លទ្ធផល​រូបភាព​សម្រាប់ Frederick Lenczycki

A pedophile Catholic priest made young boys dress up as the Baby Jesus in swaddling clothes then sexually abused them. Frederick Lenczycki, 74, admitted two counts of sodomy Thursday, after a court in St Louis, Missouri, was told how he molested two boys between 1991 and 1994.

One of the victims had his genitals repeatedly grabbed by Lenczycki, while the pervert clergyman kept trying to rip the second one’s clothes off. They were attacked while he was chaplain of St Louis’s DePaul Health Center. Lenczyski, who will be sentenced on August 15, had previously been charged with sexually abusing three other boys in Chicago during the 1980s.

Lenczyski admitted his crimes in St Louis County Circuit Court Thursday. Those youngsters told how the priest, who they knew as Father Fred, would swaddle them in cloths like the Baby Jesus was after being born. He did so under the guise of organizing religious pageants, which never took place, and which were used as a front for the abuse.

Lenczyski admitted that sex abuse in 2004 and was jailed for five years. Randy Kanaday, who is one of the two victims Lenczyski admitted attacking at Thursday’s court hearing, said the pervert’s guilty plea would help put his ordeal behind him. He told the St Louis Post-Dispatch: ‘I am so relieved that justice finally didn’t give up on me. ‘For all those years, people looked the other way, it felt like. And now, finally, something’s being done.’ Church and court files seen by the paper say Lenczyki admitted abusing up to 30 boys across Illinois, Missouri and California over the course of 25 years.

5 Michigan Catholic priests facing 21 child sex abuse charges

May 31, 2019

LANSING, Mich. (WXYZ) — Five Michigan Catholic priests have been charged with a total of 21 counts of criminal sexual conduct.

Four of the men have been arrested while one awaits extradition in India. A sixth Michigan priest is facing an administrative complaint and his license as a professional educationally limited counselor has been suspended.

“In the last 30 hours, more than a dozen members of our investigative team have been in courtrooms in Washtenaw, Wayne, Genesee, Macomb and Berrien Counties while other members of our team have been working with local law enforcement in Arizona, California, Florida and Michigan – all in a carefully executed plan to take these charged defendants off the streets,” said Nessel. “Almost all of these charges came as a direct result of calls to our tip line but were then corroborated by files seized from the dioceses last fall, followed by multiple interviews with victims.”

Charges were filed as follows:

  • Timothy Michael Crowley, 69, Lansing Diocese, was charged in Washtenaw County with four felony counts of Criminal Sexual Conduct (CSC) 1, a maximum sentence of life in prison and a lifetime of electronic monitoring, and four felony counts of CSC 2 – a maximum sentence of 15 years in prison. Crowley, who was a priest in various parishes, including St. Thomas Rectory in Ann Arbor, was arrested Thursday in Tempe, Arizona.
  • Neil Kalina, 63, Archdiocese of Detroit, was charged in Macomb County with one felony count of CSC 4, a maximum sentence of 15 years in prison and a lifetime of electronic monitoring. Kalina, who was a priest at St. Kiernan Catholic Church in Shelby Township, was arrested Thursday in Littlerock, California.
  • Vincent DeLorenzo, 80, Lansing Diocese, was charged in Genesee County with three felony counts of CSC 1, a maximum sentence of life in prison and a lifetime of electronic monitoring, and three felony counts of CSC 2, a maximum sentence of 15 years in prison. DeLorenzo, who was a priest at Holy Redeemer Church in Burton, was arrested Thursday in Marion County, Florida.
  • Patrick Casey, 55, Archdiocese of Detroit, was charged in Wayne County with one felony count of CSC 3, a maximum sentence of 15 years in prison. Casey, who was a priest at St. Theodore of Canterbury Parish in Westland, was arrested Thursday in Oak Park, Michigan.
  • Jacob Vellian, 84, Kalamazoo Diocese, was charged with two counts of Rape, a maximum sentence of life in prison. Vellian was a priest at St. John the Evangelist Parish, Benton Harbor, and now lives in Kerala, India.

Some of the clergy arrested were “hiding in plain sight,” Nessel said.

During a news conference, Deputy Solicitor General Ann Sherman shared one instance where a priest was discussing another priest’s abuse of a child and shared his own philosophy on sexual assault. The priest allegedly implied the child teased and enticed the priest for the abuse to occur.

Right.

Police Raid Dallas Catholic Diocese For Documents On Sex Abuse Allegations

May 16, 2019

លទ្ធផល​រូបភាព​សម្រាប់ Edmundo Paredes

DALLAS (AP) — Police searched the offices of the Catholic Diocese of Dallas on Wednesday after an investigation into child sexual abuse allegations against a former priest uncovered claims against others, a police commander said.

Investigators searched the diocesan headquarters and also a storage unit it uses and the offices of a church, police Maj. Max Geron told reporters.

We believed at this point that the execution of the search warrants was wholly appropriate for the furtherance of the investigation at this point,” Geron said.

The events began last August with the investigation of Edmundo Paredes , a former priest who is believed to have fled Texas following claims that he abused three teenagers. That investigation resulted in allegations of abuse by others, Geron said.

A copy of the warrants obtained by WFAA-TV refers to the 70-year-old Paredes and four others. All five were named in a report released in January by the diocese that identified former priests credibly accused of sexually assaulting a child.

Paredes is suspended from the diocese; the other four are suspended, on leave, retired or stripped of clerical duties.

Geron declined to release details on the suspects, potential victims or when abuse may have occurred. He said Wednesday’s search was meant to turn up documentation or data concerning the allegations against the men.

Pope mandates reporting of sex abuse to church, not police

May 10, 2019

Because self-policing has worked so well in the past. Oh, wait…

Pope Francis speaks during a meeting with the dioceses of Rome, at the Vatican Basilica of St. John Lateran, in Rome, Thursday, May 9, 2019. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

The pope continues to be a major part of the problem.

VATICAN CITY (AP) — Pope Francis issued a groundbreaking new church law Thursday requiring all Catholic priests and nuns around the world to report clergy sexual abuse and cover-ups by their superiors to church authorities, in a new effort to hold the Catholic hierarchy accountable for failing to protect their flocks.

The law provides whistleblower protections for anyone making a report and requires all dioceses to have a system in place to receive the claims confidentially. And it outlines internal procedures for conducting preliminary investigations when the accused is a bishop, cardinal or religious superior.

Abuse victims and their advocates said the law was a step forward, but not enough since it doesn’t require the crimes to be reported to police and essentially tasks discredited bishops who have mishandled abuse for decades with policing their own.

It’s the latest effort by Francis to respond to the global sex abuse and cover-up scandal that has devastated the credibility of the Catholic hierarchy and his own papacy. And it provides a new legal framework for U.S. bishops as they prepare to adopt accountability measures next month to respond to the scandal there.

“People must know that bishops are at the service of the people,” said Archbishop Charles Scicluna, the Vatican’s longtime sex crimes prosecutor. “They are not above the law, and if they do wrong, they must be reported.”

The decree requires the world’s 415,000 Catholic priests and 660,000 nuns to tell church authorities when they learn or have “well-founded motives to believe” a cleric or sister has engaged in sexual abuse of a minor, sexual misconduct with an adult, possession of child pornography — or that a superior has covered up any of those crimes.

It doesn’t require them to report to police, however. The Vatican has long argued that different legal systems make a universal reporting law impossible, and that imposing one could endanger the church in places where Catholics are a persecuted minority. But the procedures do for the first time put into universal law that victims cannot be silenced, that clergy must obey civil reporting requirements where they live, and that their obligation to report to the church in no way interferes with that.

The global victims group Ending Clergy Abuse, or ECA, said the Vatican shouldn’t hide behind the argument that mandatory reporting to police is a problem in some countries.

“The church should establish the law for reporting and justify the exception,” said ECA’s Peter Iseley. “Instead, they are using the exception as a pretext for not reporting sexual abuse to civil authorities and to keep abuse secret.”

If implemented fully, though, the Vatican could well see an avalanche of abuse and cover-up reports. The decree can be applied retroactively, meaning priests and nuns are now required to report even old cases of sexual wrongdoing and cover-ups — and enjoy whistleblower protections for doing so.

Previously such reporting was left to the conscience of individual priests and nuns.

Canon lawyer Kurt Martens called the new law “revolutionary” by making sex abuse of minors and adults, as well as official cover-ups, subject to mandatory reporting.

“We owe gratitude to Pope Francis for this universal law of the Church, ensuring that a victim who wishes to tell his or her story cannot be silenced,” Martens tweeted.

Anne Barrett Doyle of BishopAccountability praised some of the provisions but said they weren’t enough, primarily because there were no sanctions envisaged for violations, and because the process remained entirely internal.

Bishops watching bishops does not work,” she said.

While there are no punitive measures foreseen for noncompliance, bishops and religious superiors could be accused of cover-up or negligence if they fail to implement the provisions or retaliate against priests and nuns who make reports against them.

The law defines the crimes that must be reported as: performing sexual acts with a minor or vulnerable person; forcing an adult “by violence or threat or through abuse of authority, to perform or submit to sexual acts”; and the production, possession or distribution of child pornography. Cover-up is defined as “actions or omissions intended to interfere with or avoid” civil or canonical investigations.

Cardinal Marc Ouellet, head of the Vatican’s bishops’ office, said the inclusion of sex crimes involving adults was a clear reference to cases of sexual abuse of nuns and seminarians by their superiors — a scandal that has exploded recently following reports, including by The Associated Press and the Vatican’s own women’s magazine, of sisters being sexually assaulted by priests.

The pope mandated that victims reporting abuse must be welcomed, listened to and supported by the hierarchy, as well as offered spiritual, medical and psychological assistance.

The law says victims can’t be forced to keep quiet, even though the investigation itself is still conducted under pontifical secret. And in a novelty, the law requires that if victims request it, they must be told of the outcome of the investigation — again a response to complaints that victims are kept in the dark about how their claims were handled.

Victims and their advocates have long complained that bishops and religious superiors have escaped justice for having engaged in sexual misconduct themselves, or failed to protect their flocks from predator priests. Bishops and religious superiors are accountable only to the pope, and only a handful have ever been sanctioned or removed for sex abuse or cover-up, and usually only after particularly egregious misbehavior became public.

Last summer, the scandal over ex-Cardinal Theodore McCarrick epitomized the trend: McCarrick rose to the heights of the Catholic hierarchy even though he had credible allegations of sexual misconduct with adults against him that the Vatican had received. Francis defrocked McCarrick this year after a U.S. church investigation determined he sexually abused minors as well as adult seminarians.

The new procedures call for any claim of sexual misconduct or cover-up against a bishop, religious superior or Eastern Rite patriarch to be reported to the Holy See and the metropolitan bishop, who is a regular diocesan bishop also responsible for a broader geographic area than his dioceses alone.

Unless the metropolitan bishop finds the claim “manifestly unfounded,” he must immediately ask permission from the Vatican to open a preliminary investigation and must hear back from Rome within 30 days — a remarkably fast turnaround for the lethargic Holy See. The metropolitan bishop then has an initial 90 days to conduct the investigation, though extensions are possible.

The law makes clear he can use lay experts to help, a key provision that is already used in many dioceses. And it recommends that a special fund be set up to pay for the investigations, particularly in poorer parts of the world.

Once the investigation is over, the metropolitan sends the results to the Vatican for a decision on how to proceed.

The new law requires Vatican offices to share information throughout the process, since an untold number of cases have fallen through the cracks, thanks to the silo-like nature of the Holy See bureaucracy.

The procedures published Thursday are likely to form a key legal framework for U.S. bishops when they meet in Baltimore June 11-13 to adopt new accountability procedures, though it will certainly force them to scrap their existing proposals and make them conform to the new law.

Priest accused of sexual abuse arrested trying to leave Costa Rica

May 3, 2019

Police have arrested a former priest dismissed by the Vatican following accusations he sexually abused young girls in Timor-Leste.

Richard Dascbach, 82, who has reportedly admitted abusing children at Topu Honis orphanage he founded in Kutet in Oecusse district was arrested on April 28, according to local media reports.

The former Divine Word Society priest was taken to custody following mounting pressure from child activists and families of alleged victims, who expressed outrage he had been allowed to return last year to the orphanage he had founded, after the abuses came to light.

Doubts were expressed over the Timor-Leste’s government commitment to pursuing the case.

“I am relieved to hear he has finally been arrested,” a source and long-time supporter of the orphanage told ucanews.com on April 29.
“Justice has taken over a year in coming when the scandal broke,” said the source, who did not wish to be named.

However, many people in the community are still supportive of the former priest, because he is considered a “hero” for his contribution in the 1999 war of independence against Indonesia.

During the war, Dashbach led a local militia in protecting the locality and provided support for the community in many ways, including dispensing medicine and food to families in need.

He is even considered to have magical abilities and thus the people both revere and fear him. All of this makes the local people not want to believe the allegations,” the source said.

Before being taken away, police allowed him to say goodbye to the community, which was recorded in a video circulated on Facebook.
The source added that the new orphanage director, Liliana Tarung, was also arrested for attacking a former resident who she suspected of having reported the abuse.

It wasn’t clear who was looking after the orphanage in her absence.
Daschbach’s arrest came after Fokupers, a Timorese advocacy group that supports women and children, published an interview with a victim who gave details about the abuse last week.

The victim, who was 8 years old when she first went to the orphanage, said she and her friends were asked to sleep in the same bed as Daschbach, who she said would sexually abuse them.
She said they were afraid and respected him so they did what he wanted.

Timor-Leste police arrest US former priest for sex abuse

April 30, 2019

Timor-Leste police arrest US former priest for sex abuse

Police have arrested a former priest dismissed by the Vatican following accusations he sexually abused young girls in Timor-Leste.

Richard Dascbach, 82, who has reportedly admitted abusing children at Topu Honis orphanage he founded in Kutet in Oecusse district was arrested on April 28, according to local media reports.

The former Divine Word Society priest was taken to custody following mounting pressure from child activists and families of alleged victims, who expressed outrage he had been allowed to return last year to the orphanage he had founded, after the abuses came to light.

Doubts were expressed over the Timor-Leste’s government commitment to pursuing the case.

“I am relieved to hear he has finally been arrested,” a source and long-time supporter of the orphanage told ucanews.com on April 29.
“Justice has taken over a year in coming when the scandal broke,” said the source, who did not wish to be named.

However, many people in the community are still supportive of the former priest, because he is considered a “hero” for his contribution in the 1999 war of independence against Indonesia.

During the war, Dashbach led a local militia in protecting the locality and provided support for the community in many ways, including dispensing medicine and food to families in need.

“He is even considered to have magical abilities and thus the people both revere and fear him. All of this makes the local people not want to believe the allegations,” the source said.

Before being taken away, police allowed him to say goodbye to the community, which was recorded in a video circulated on Facebook.
The source added that the new orphanage director, Liliana Tarung, was also arrested for attacking a former resident who she suspected of having reported the abuse.

It wasn’t clear who was looking after the orphanage in her absence.
Daschbach’s arrest came after Fokupers, a Timorese advocacy group that supports women and children, published an interview with a victim who gave details about the abuse last week.

The victim, who was 8 years old when she first went to the orphanage, said she and her friends were asked to sleep in the same bed as Daschbach, who she said would sexually abuse them.
She said they were afraid and respected him so they did what he wanted.

ISIS supporters celebrate deadliest-ever attack with poster of burning Pope, Trump and a statue of the Buddha

April 26, 2019

When people really believe the tenets of their religion what often happens is carnage.

WHAT WE KNOW SO FAR:

  • At least 359 people killed and 500 injured after nine suicide bombers attacked three churches, four hotels and a block of flats in Sri Lanka
  • Thirty-nine foreigners were killed including eight Brits, ‘several’ Americans, one Dutch, one Chinese, two Turkish, three Danes and one Portuguese national
  • 40 suspects have been arrested
  • Authorities name local Islamic terror group National Thowheeth Jama’ath as being responsible for the attacks saying they were helped by ‘international network’ of jihadis
  • ISIS claims the suicide bombers were ‘soldiers of the Islamic State’

After claiming responsibility for the atrocity, the brainwashed death cult’s official media channel Amaq issued a disturbing poster.

The chilling propaganda post featured the masked extremists believed to have carried out the bombings in Sri Lanka above images of the Pope, US President Trump and a statue of Buddha.

And a clerk from the downtown Colombo KwikiMart.

Along with splatters of blood, the sinister image also includes depictions of fire.

On the poster, the warped militants wrote: “We will not make you cry of blood, enemies of religion and the first of the clouds shall fall upon the rivers of unclean blood.”

The coordinated attack, which involved nine suicide bombers, is believed to the terror group’s biggest ever mass murder.

ISIS’s previous largest attack was a bomb assault on a shopping district in Karrada, Baghdad, which left 340 dead in 2016.

Their deadliest attack in Europe remains the Paris massacre in November, 2015, which claimed the lives of 130 innocent people.

Meanwhile, one of the suicide bombers who studied in the UK has been identified as Abdul Lathief Jameel Mohamed.

He is believed to have attended a university in the southeast of England between 2006 and 2007, security sources told Sky News.

He was responsible for the smaller suicide blast at the Dehiwala hotel in southern Colombo hours after the later explosions, it has been reported.

Officials earlier revealed that the twisted ISIS extremist also studied for a post-graduate degree in Australia.

It has since emerged that he attended a university in Melbourne, reports the Age.com.

Speaking at a news conference, State Minister of Defence Ruwan Wijewardene said: “We believe that one of the suicide bombers studied in the UK and later did his postgraduate studies in Australia before coming back to settle in Sri Lanka.”

The bombshell revelation that one of the depraved extremists studied in the UK has sparked fears that he could have been radicalised while living in this country.

Isn’t religion wonderful?

Pope during Easter vigil: Reject the ‘glitter of wealth’

April 22, 2019

Could anything be more ironic? The pope, the master of bling, telling people to reject glitter. We here at fuckthepope.com are laughing our collective asses off.

Image result for vatican gold

“Sin seduces; it promises things easy and quick, prosperity and success, but leaves behind only solitude and death,” the pope said.

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