C of E

Priest extradited to UK on sexual assault charges

February 1, 2019

 

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Meirion Griffiths, trying hard to evade justice

 

AN ANGLICAN priest, the Revd Meirion Griffiths, has been extradited from Australia on charges of historic sexual abuse.

Mr Griffiths, of Coachwood Way, Maddington, Perth, was arrested and charged in Perth in November 2017, and has been fighting extradition ever since. He arrived at Heathrow in the early hours of Thursday and appeared at Crawley Magistrates Court, where he entered a plea of not guilty. There was no application for bail, and he has been remanded in custody.

A news release from Sussex Police on Thursday said that he had been charged on an extradition warrant issued by Westminster Magistrates’ Court in London in December 2016. “The warrant alleges that he committed several indecent assaults against a girl then in her late teens in the mid-1970’s, and several indecent assaults against a woman then in her mid-twenties in 1982. All the offences are alleged to have taken place at various locations in West Sussex.”

He is believed to be the first Anglican priest to be extradited on historic sexual charges. The only other priest known to have been extradited was Laurence Soper, a former Roman Catholic priest, who jumped bail and spent five years in Kosovo. He was returned to the UK in 2017 and is currently serving 18 years in prison for sexual offences against schoolboys in Ealing.

Mr Griffiths, who is 80, was ordained in 1966. He served curacies in north London, Taunton, and Radipole (Salisbury diocese), before becoming Rector of St Pancras and St John, Chichester, from 1974 to 1982 (when the offences are alleged to have taken place). He then moved to Wales, serving as Rector of Corwen and Llangar, and Rural Dean of Edeyrnion (St Asaph diocese) from 1982 to 1988.

In 1988, he moved to Australia, where he was Assistant Curate of Albany, Rector of Collie, and then Priest-in-Charge of Maddington. He retired in 2000.

Mr Griffiths is to appear at Portsmouth Crown Court on 1 March.

Just one in ten babies in England is baptised into the Church of England with the numbers even lower in London at three in every hundred

January 26, 2019

 

Only one in ten babies is baptised into the Church of England. The figures are particularly low in cities

 

Here is more evidence of the decline of the Church of England – 

 

Only one in ten babies is baptised into the Church of England – and in London, the figure is even lower at three in every 100, a national breakdown of the Church’s strength has revealed.

The tiny minority of infants who are introduced to Christianity by the CofE in London is mirrored in other major cities.

In Birmingham, only 5 per cent of babies are christened by the Anglican church; in Bristol it’s 6 per cent; in Manchester 8 per cent; and in Nottingham 9 per cent.

Only one in ten babies is baptised into the Church of England. The figures are particularly low in cities +2
Only one in ten babies is baptised into the Church of England. The figures are particularly low in cities

But the proportion of newborn children who are baptised is much higher in provincial towns and rural areas. In the Hereford diocese, for example, one in four babies is christened by the CofE.

The figures come from an analysis of churchgoing in 2017 in the CofE’s 46 dioceses. It shows that across England an average of 10 per cent of babies under one were baptised – down from 14 per cent in 2007.

Less than 50 people attend Sunday services at a typical English parish church. The figures for the London diocese do not include the capital south of the Thames, which is the Southwark diocese, where 5 per cent of babies under one are baptised into the CofE.

The Reverend Sandra Millar, its head of christenings, weddings and funerals, said: ‘Cities often have more transient populations as well as more religious diversity.’

The Church of England has issued guidance on how churches can welcome transgender people into the Anglican faith with a ‘celebratory’ service for those who have transitioned +2
The Church of England has issued guidance on how churches can welcome transgender people into the Anglican faith with a ‘celebratory’ service for those who have transitioned

C of E Sex abuse bishop backed by Prince Charles tries to start a new life as a Catholic

August 4, 2018

 

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  • Peter Ball has moved to Somerset to start a new life after sex abuse conviction  
  • Ball, 86, was jailed for 32 months in October 2015 for historic abuse against boys 
  • The former bishop of Lewes and Gloucester was a friend of Prince Charles 

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A sex abuser bishop who was supported by Prince Charles has started a new life in the West Country where he hopes to become a Catholic.

Peter Ball, 86, moved into an 18th century property in a Somerset village after his release from prison last year for abusing 16 young men.

The revelations come days after it emerged Charles had described him as the victim of ‘monstrous wrongs’.

The supportive relationship was detailed in a series of letters given to the child sex abuse inquiry, which heard new claims of an alleged Establishment ‘cover up’ of Ball’s behaviour.

Despite his offences, the former bishop of Lewes and Gloucester is still the recipient of a generous Church of England pension.

Ball last night said he had been forbidden from discussing the ongoing inquiry, which is investigating how he escaped prosecution for decades after his offending came to light.

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